Rowley Station

All aboard! See Rowley Station as it looked in Edwardian times - enjoy a look around the signal box, waiting rooms and yard.

Beamish Unlimited

UPDATE: Following the announcement of Tier 3 restrictions for the North East, we’ll be reopening our GROUNDS ONLY for festive visits from Saturday, 5th December.

Due to COVID-19 restrictions we are unable to open our exhibits and run our transport (except our wheelchair accessible bus). Click here for our Visitor Information Guide, including map.

Timeslot tickets are available to book online for visits to Beamish from 5th to 18th December (museum open Wed-Sun, 10am to 4pm, closed Mon and Tues). The government is due to review the tier system by mid-December and we’ll keep everyone updated about tickets for later in December.

To book your timeslot please click here.

All aboard! See Rowley Station as it looked in Edwardian times – enjoy a look around the signal box, waiting rooms and goods yard with a variety of waggons on display.

The station was originally in Rowley, near Consett, County Durham, in 1867. It has never had gas or electricity and was always lit by oil. The station was the first relocated building to be opened at the museum and was officially unveiled in 1976 by Poet Laureate Sir John Betjeman.

A wrought-iron footbridge from The 1900s Town crosses the railway line and leads towards the signal box, dating from 1896. Across the tracks in the Goods Yard is a Goods Shed, dating from 1850.

The coal drops from West Boldon reflect the important role of local coal merchants in towns and villages. The coal office, originally owned by James White of Hexham, is of a type which was found in almost every railway goods yard up to the late 1960s.

A variety of waggons can be seen in and around Rowley Station, on a regularly changing pattern of display.

Passengers can enjoy short return steam train rides from Rowley Station during weekends and local school holidays, depending on availability of locomotives.